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Marty Marion Marty Marion
Shortstop, Right-handed; St. Louis Cardinals 1940-1951; Player Coach and Manager St. Louis Browns 1952-1953.

Marty Marion was the top fielding shortstop during the 1940s. His nicknames of 'Octopus' and 'Slats' fitted his long legs and arms, - 6'2, 170lbs. Marion was noted for his ability to scoop-up ground balls hit deep into the hole and for his rapid throwing arm nailing opposing batters.

Marion became a regular with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1940 and his outstanding play helped the Red Birds win the pennant in 1942. Marty led the NL with 38 Doubles.

In his peak years 1942 to 1949, the Cardinals won three World Series and lost one. Marion was named to seven straight All-Star games including a starter five times.

In 1944, Marty Marion was named the NL Most Valuable Player and led the league in leading fielding percentage, he only hit .267 with 26 doubles but was the team leader for bringing the pennant to the Cardinals.

As a child, Marty fell into a 20-foot pit and spent better than six months in a body cast, his right leg was severely injured giving him a trick knee which kept him out of World War II and shorted his major league career. Marty Marion served as a playing coach for the St. Louis Browns in 1952 and 1953. He collected 1448 career hits and had a lifetime batting average of .263. baseballhistorian.com




Catcher Del Rice Catcher Del Rice
Catcher, Right-handed; St. Louis Cardinals 1945-1955; Milwaukee Braves 1956-1959; Chicago Cubs 1960; Los Angeles Dodgers 1961

Del Rice was the St. Louis Cardinals catcher for 11 years. His batting average was never too high but he ranked as a fine defensive catcher. In 1950 his .992 fielding pct was second best in the league and Rice's .987 career mark ranks with the best of catchers. In 1951 playing in 122 games, he hit .251, 9 homers and 47 RBI's. His best batting year was 1952, Rice caught 147 games, pounded 27 doubles, 11 home runs and drove in 65 runs.

Del Rice was traded to the Milwaukee Braves in 1956 and was used as a backup catcher to Del Crandall during the next four seasons. Del Rice was a good contact hitter and fanned only 522 times in 3826 at bats spanning 17 years. Del Rice career: .237 BA, 1309 games, 177 doubles and 79 home runs.



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Joe Torre Joe Torre
Catcher, 3B, 1B, Right-handed; Milwaukee Braves 1960-1965; Atlanta Braves 1966-68; St. Louis Cardinals 1968-74; New York Mets 1975-77

Hard hitting Joe Torre started his career as a catcher for the Milwaukee Braves in 1961. Torre hit .321 in 1964, slugged 36 doubles, 20 homers with 109 RBI's.

The Braves moved to Atlanta and in his first year in the new ballpark, Torre hit a career high 36 home runs. He won a Gold Glove in 1965 and was selected for nine All-Star teams. Torre was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1969 and the next year hit .325, 21 HRs, 100 RBIs.

In 1971, he was the NL's Most Valuable Player and led the majors with a .363 BA, 230 hits, 137 RBI's. He retired in 1977, and since then managed the Mets, Braves, Cardinals and is currently the Yankees' manager.

Joe Torre stats: .297 BA, 2342 hits, 344 Ds, 252 HRs in 2209 games.




Bob Allison Bob Allison
Right-fielder, OF, 1B, Righthanded; Washington Senators 1958-1960; Minnesota Twins 1961-1970; Born 7/11/1934; Raytown, Missouri

Minnesota Twins' star right-fielder Bob Allison hit 30 or more homers three times and 20 or more in eight different seasons. A gifted all-around athletic, Allison, 6'4" 220 lbs, was a star baseball and football player at the University of Missouri.

In 1959, his rookie season, Allison hit 30 home runs, led the American League in triples (9), was named to the All-Star team and was honored by being voted the Rookie of the Year.

When the Washington Senators moved to Minnesota in 1961, Allison became a local hero and along with teammate Harmon Killebrew made one of the best one-two punches in baseball.

In 1963, Allison slugged 25 doubles, 35 home runs, 91 RBI's and led the AL in runs scored with 99. On May 17, 1963, he hit three homers in a single game. Like all power hitters, Allison struck out a lot and his strike outs to at bats ratio was one for every 4.87 at bats, placing him high among the leaders in that dubious category. Allison's competitive attitude was praised by teammates and opponents alike. His strong arm rated as one of the best in the AL during the 1960's.

Bob Allison's diving catch off the bat of Dodgers Jim Lefebve in the 2nd game of the 1965 World Series has been called, 'the best catch in Twins' history.

Bob Allison's career: .255 BA, 255 D's, 53 T's, 256 HR's, 811 R's, 796 RBI's, .360 on base pct, ,471 slg/pct, 84 stolen bases. baseballhistorian.com archives



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Tommy John Tommy John
Pitcher Left-handed, Cleveland Indians 1963-64; Chicago White Sox 1965-71; Los Angeles Dodgers 1972-78; New York Yankees 1979-82, 1986-89; California Angels 1983-85

Tommy John was a big name pitcher during the '60s, '70's and '80's. His fastball had a natural side-to-side movement. He also threw a curve ball, which he changed speeds on continually. Tommy John won 288 lifetime games and hurled 46 shutouts. He pitched a since broken record of 26 years in the major leagues.

In 1965, he was 14-7 for the Chicago White Sox, made the American League's All-Star team in 1968 with a 1.98 ERA.

He was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1971 and became one of baseball's brightest stars. In 1967, Tommy John went 20-7 2.78 ERA for the Dodgers.

Pitching for the New York Yankees in 1979, John was 21-9, .700 pct along with a 2.96 ERA. Tommy John's career: 288-231, 3.34 ERA, 760G, 700GS, 162GC, pitched 46 shutouts, allowed 4,783 hits in 4,710 innings.




Wayne Terwilliger Wayne Terwilliger
Second Baseman, RH; Chicago Cubs 1949-1951; Washington Senators 1953-54; New York Giants 1955-56; Kansas City A's 1959-60

A slick fielding, top-of-the-line second baseman, Wayne Terwilliger 5' 11", 164 lbs, broke in with the Chicago Cubs in 1949, continued to improve and played his position skillfully. An intelligent fielder, 'Twig" played the batters, setting himself up to field ground balls. In 1950 he handled 718 chances for a high .967 fielding percentage. Terwilliger was a highly popular player and always found time for his many fans, signing autographs and talking general baseball stuff.

His batting average was not too high but his career on-base-pct was a fine .323. In 1950, Terwilliger hit .242, 22 doubles, 3 triples and hit a career high 10 home runs, giving the Cubs six hitters in double figures for HR's. His 13 stolen bases led the Cubs' team. Playing for the Washington Senators in 1953, Wayne Terwilliger hit .252, with 62 runs scored and used his speed to hit 24 doubles, his on-base-pct was .343.

He was traded to the New York Giants in 1955 and from then-on used for his fielding genius - playing about 80 games a year. He played for the expansion Kansas City A's his last season.

Terwilliger has been a minor coach and manager and excels at handling young ballplayers. Wayne Terwilliger career: .240, 93 doubles, 10 triples, 22 homers, 271 runs scored, 2091 at bats in 666 games. Terwilliger rates high on baseball fans' list for his pleasing, nice guy personality. Baseball Historian



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1943-1957 Eddie Miksis 1943-1957 Eddie Miksis
2nd Base, SS - RH; Brooklyn Dodgers 1944-1951; Chicago Cubs 1951-1956; St. Louis Cardinals 1957

Eddie Miksis joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1944 and was mainly a quality fielding utility infielder, averaging around 55 games per/year for his first seven years in the majors. He did play in 86 games for the Dodgers in 1948 but hit only .213. Miksis was shipped to the Cubs in June of 1951, played regularly, sparkled defensively at 2nd base, his hitting improved and in 1953 he batted .251, scored 61 runs, lined 17 two base hits, 6 triples , hit 8 homers and stole 13 bases. He saw limited action in 1954 due to injuries. In 1955, Miksis played in 131 games and hit 9 homers. He was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1957 and again was used mainly as a utility infielder. Eddie Miksis career numbers: .236 BA, 722 hits in 3,053 at bats, 95 doubles and 44 home runs. Baseball Historian




 


Star Players and Promising Rookies - 1967
Was this the 'Decade of the Pitchers?' Time seems to indicate that, indeed, it was. Every one of the 20 major league teams posted earned run averages of under 3.50 in '67 except the new expansion teams - Kansas City A's 3.68, the New York Mets 3.73 and the Houston Astros 4.03 ERA.

The Chicago White Sox compiled a resounding team ERA of 2.45, the lowest in the majors since 1919, when the Chicago Cubs had a 2.21 ERA and the Cincinnati Reds had a 2.23.

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Baseball History

1967 Home Run Leaders:

Carl Yastrzemski, Red Sox 44... Harmon Killebrew, Twins 44... Hank Aaron, Atl Braves 39... Jim Wynn, Astros 37... Frank Howard, Wash. Senators 36... Willie McCovey, SF Giants 31... Ron Santo, Cubs 31... Frank Robinson, Orioles 30... Jim Ray Hart, SF Giants 29... Billy Williams 28...

1967 Earned Run Average Leaders:

Phil Niekro, Atl Braves 1.87 ERA... Joe Horlen, White Sox 2.06 ERA... Gary Peters, White Sox 2.28 ERA... Jim Bunning, Phillies 2.29... Sonny Siebert, Indians 2.38 ERA... Chris Short, Phillies 2.39 ERA... Tommy John, White Sox 2.47 ERA...

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* Hank Aaron, Atlanta Braves Outfielder RH - as a fielder, he was a smooth, cruising glider and his fine, accurate throwing arm enabled him to play either left or right fields. With his natural speed and intelligent base running Aaron stole 240 career bases and was nailed stealing just 73 times and was rarely thrown out while running the bases. In his long career, 'Hank the Hammer' batted .305 lifetime, hit 624 doubles, 755 home runs, scored 2,174 runs and had 2,297 RBIs (1954-1976).

In 1967, the 33-year old Hank Aaron continued his annual, consistent hitting, as he led the Atlanta Braves in batting, RBIs, doubles, homers and stolen bases - .307 BA, 109 RBIs, 37Ds, 39Hr and 17 stolen bases. In his first 14 seasons (1954-'67) Aaron had 9 years with over 100 RBIs and 13 years of over 89 RBIs. And, for the last 13 consecutive seasons, he's scored over 100 runs every year - that's a incredible feat. From 1957-'67, he strung together home run totals of 44, 30, 39, 40, 34, 45, 44, 24, 32, 44 and 39 en-route to his major league career-best record of 755 homers. Certainly, Hank Aaron rates as one of the greatest players in baseball history.

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* Gaylord Perry, San Francisco Giants Pitcher RH - he had a 12-11 record in his first full major league season in 1964. And, won 21 games while losing just 8, with a fine 2.99 ERA in 1966 as a 28-year old. Armed with a blazing fastball during his first years, the future Hall of Famer lowered his earned run average to 2.61 in 1967, which was the best on the Giants' pitching staff, and his 230 strikeouts was third best in the National League.

* Tony Cloninger, Atlanta Braves Pitcher RH - he broke into the minors with Eau Claire of Wisconsin back in '58 and was brought up to the majors with the Milwaukee Braves in 1961. Cloninger reached stardom in 1964 by going 19-14 and then posting a resounding 24-11 record the following season (1965) which was the second highest amount of wins in the majors - trailing only legend Sandy Koufax 26-8 mark. In '66, he went with the team when They moved to Atlanta and posted a 14-11 W/L mark. In 1967, Cloninger was nagged by an eye injury which sidelined him for most of the campaign, and he ended with a 4-7 record, 5.12 ERA.

* Jose Cardenal, California Angels Outfielder RH - an exciting player, he set an Angels' team record by stealing a base in 11 consecutive games in 1966. Acquired from San Francisco in 1964, the speedy flyhawk was one of the leading defensive outfielders in the AL. In 1966, he batted .276, lined 15 doubles, 16 home runs, scored 67 runs, and stole 24 bases in 154 games. In '67, he was beset by injuries, played just 108 games and hit .236, had 24 extra base hits in 381 at-bats. Born in Matanzas, Cuba, Jose Cardenal is the cousin of major leaguer Bert Campaneris.

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Power Hitters:

Jim Ray Hart, San Francisco Giants 3rd Baseman/OF - a power-packed third baseman, he was one of the NL top stars during the 1960s. In his rookie season of 1964, Jim Ray Hart crashed 31 homers, had 81 RBIs and batted a solid .286. In '67 he whacked 26 doubles, 29 homers, scored 98 runs and drove in 98 runs. A consistent performer, Hart batted .286, .299, .285, .289 in his first four major league seasons... and hit 31, 23, 33 and 29 homers.

* Johnny Callison, Philadelphia Phillies Outfielder - currently fifth on the all-time Phillies' list (as of '67) in triples with 77 and in homers with 157. Callison hit from 1962 thru 1965 - 23, 26, 31 and 32 homers and in these four seasons, led the NL in outfield assists. A dangerous clutch-hitter, he had over 100 RBIs in '64 and '65. His throwing arm was also rated as one of the best in the history of baseball.

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* Dalton Jones, Boston Red Sox Third Baseman/2B - the left-handed batting Jones broke into professional ball with Alphine in '61 and in his second minor league season he led the Eastern League with 13 triples while playing for York. The Red Sox signed him to a nice bonus and he was brought up to Boston in 1964 and in his rookie year he lined 16 doubles, 4 triples, 6 homers in 118 games, 374 at-bats. A contact, line-drive hitter, Dalton Jones batted .289 in 89 games in 1967, third best on the team. And, capped off the season by hitting a solid .389 in the 1967 World Series... collecting 7 hits in 18 at-bats.

* Sonny Jackson, Houston Astros Shortstop - one of the fastest runners in the game, he set a Astro batting mark with .292 in his rookie season (1966) and set a team record with 174 hits, for most singles with 160, and for stolen bases with 49. A solid defensive shortstop, after he hit just .237 the following year, he was traded to the Atlanta Braves before the start of 1968. Sonny Jackson career stats: .251 BA, 767 hits in 3,055 at-bats, 936 games, 81Ds, 28Ts, 7Hr, 396 Runs, 162 RBIs , 265Ks, 250 Walks, 126 stolen bases, 51 times caught stealing... Astros 1965-67, Braves 1968-'74.

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Promising Rookies:

* Bob Moose, Pittsburgh Pirates Starting Pitcher RH - Scouting reports states: 'a sure-win performer'... has excellent control... throws humming fastball. He was brought up by Pirates in late-'67 and started two games, was 1-0 in 14 2/3 innings, including a complete game victory.

* Bob Robertson, Pittsburgh Pirates Third Baseman/1B - a strong, right-handed power-hitter, he hit 32 home runs with Gastonia in 1965 and 32 again for Asheville in '66 before being called up with Pittsburgh in late-67 - hit 2 homers with 4 RBIs in 9 games. Pirates' management report states: 'he's one of the highest regarded power-hitters in the minor leagues... tab for brilliant future.'

* Joe Niekro, Chicago Cubs Pitcher RH - the 22-year old proved to be a real find last season ('67) after joining the Cubs' staff with just one year of minor league ball under his belt. The rookie posted a solid 10-7 record, 3.34 ERA, completed 7-of-22 starts, including 2 shutouts in 169.7 innings. And, the younger brother of pitcher, Phil, won four off his last five starts. He also was the Cubs' leading hitter of the pitchers, with 11 RBIs. And, of course, after going 14-10 the next year ('68) the Cubs traded him to the expansion team - the San Diego Padres.

* Mike Marshall, Detroit Tigers Relief Pitcher RH - last season (1967) he was one of the best rookie pitchers in the major leagues. He appeared in 39 games, collected 10 saves, had a 1-3 record, struck out 41 batters, walked 20 in 59 innings of work, and posted an outstanding 1.98 ERA... throws a 4+Star fastball.

* Jim Ollom, Minnesota Twins Pitcher - the 6ft, 4inch - 210-pounder rang up a 20-8 record with Denver in '65. He debuted with Minnesota in 1966, appearing in 3 games, had no decision in 10 innings, 3.60 ERA. Noted for a blazing fastball, the left-handed Ollom was 0-1, 5.40 ERA in 1967, his final major league season.

* Frank Coggins, Washington Senators Second Baseman - rates high on scouting reports... he's fast, an excellent infielder and makes great contact at the plate. At Hawaii in '66, Coffins batted .288 with 54 RBIs. Played 19 games with the Senators in '67 and hit a solid .307 with 23 hits in 75 at-bats.

* Dick Nold, Washington Senators Pitcher - a highly promising right-handed, starting pitcher, he started 3 games in 1967, relieved in 4 others and was 0-2 for the year, walked 13, struck out 10 in 20 1/3 innings, with a 4.87 ERA. Nold won 20 games in '64 with Geneva in the minors. 1967 was Nold's only major league season.

Baseballhistorian.com - Archives - Baseball History 1967



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