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Causing a sensation - the Catcher's Mask Causing a sensation - the Catcher's Mask
A company was formed just to make a glove and a catcher mask 1870s Baseball History

Eye-catching baseball posters, cleverly illustrated, inspired fans to come out and enjoy the new game sweeping the nation and buy the newest in equipment

James White picked up the nickname of Deacon, because he was a religious man and did not drink, swear or gamble and was active in Sunday School.

Right after the Civil War ended, Deacon White was introduced to the game of baseball by a couple of soldiers returning to their hometown of Canton, New York in 1864.

In 1866 the 17 year old Deacon White enjoyed playing so much he started a Caton New York team. By 1869 he was the starting catcher on the Forest City Baseball Team and in 1871 when the team became a charter member of the first major league, the National Association, White was the catcher.

Deacon White was also one of a few players responsible for bringing the curve to professional baseball. He got the curve legalized and then taught the pitch to his brother Will White, who went-on to record three 40-game win seasons.

In those days the catcher stood far behind the batter. He caught the ball barehanded on the first bounce, Deacon White later recalled. He got the idea of using a glove, made a mask for my face, and stood right behind the batter. That caused a sensation, too. Al Spalding liked the idea so well that he started a company to make them.íŽ

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The first catcher's mask - Baseball Historian

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Boston's Big Four Hitters - 1873-1875 Boston's Big Four Hitters - 1873-1875
The National Association - the first major league - featured Boston's power-laden lineup which galloped away with four consecutive pennants - 1872-1875

Boston Big Four Hitters

Early United States Baseball History

The Boston Red Stockings (later nicknamed the Braves):

Advertisements correctly stated The First Big Four Hitters

Deacon White jumped to Boston in 1873 and played a major role in the Red Stockings 43-16 win/loss record, easily besting the 2nd place Philadelphia Phillies or Whites.

The Big Four lineup consisted of Jim Deacon White, a career .303 batter, who led the league in 1877 with a hefty .387 batting mark, Al Spalding, a pitcher, OF and first baseman, who hit over .300 most years, Cal McVey and Ross Barnes.




 


Nolan Ryan - Career Strikeout Leader
Nolan Ryan, with his lightning fastball, struck out more batters than anyone in baseball history. Ryan struck out 5,714 hitters from 1966-1993. Steve Carlton is second with 4,136 K's. Next is Bert Blyleven with 3,701 and Tom Seaver follows with 3,640, Don Sutton had 3,574, Gaylord Perry 3,534, Walter Johnson 3,509, Phil Niekro 3,342, Fergie Jenkins 3.192 and Bob Gibson 3,117.



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