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Leading Pitchers 1920s Leading Pitchers 1920s
Baseball History - Leading Pitchers 1920s - compiled by staff of baseballhistorian.com

Pitchers - 1920s

Players Bios:

Rube Walberg, Athletics, Red Sox Pitcher - a big winner for Connie Mack's Philadelphia Athletics, who won three straight American League pennants 1929-1931, he collected 101 victories from 1927 thru 1932 and pitched in five World Series games.

The 6ft, 1 1/2inch- 190-pounder threw a great change-up to go with his fastball. George Elvin Rube Walberg pitched both as a starter and long reliever, starting 307 games and relieving in 237.

From 1926 thru 1932 all with the Athletics, Rube Walberg posted records of 12-10, 16-12, 17-12, 18-11, 13-12, 20-12 and 17-10... and, with the 'Great Depression' in full gear in order to cut salaries, he was traded after the 1933 season to the Boston Red Sox.

Rube Walberg career stats: 155-141 record, 4.16 ERA, 544G, 307GS, 140GC, 2,795 hits in 2,644 innings, 15 Shutouts, 32 Saves, 163 Hr allowed, 1031 Walks, 1085Ks... NY Giants 1923; Phil A's 1924-1932; Boston Red Sox 1934-1937

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Clarence Mitchell, Brooklyn Dodgers, Phillies, Cardinals Pitcher - the well-traveled veteran starter and reliever was the last National League player to legally throw the spitball. After pitching just five games with Detroit in 1911, Mitchell was out of the major leagues until Cincinnati signed him in 1916, and he ended with a 11-10 record, 3.14 ERA in 194 2/3 innings.

The left-handed knuckleballer was traded to the Brooklyn Dodgers in February of 1918. He registered a 5-2, 3 .09 ERA In 19 games in 1920 games to helped Brooklyn win the NL pennant. In the 1920 World Series, Clarence Mitchell pitched 4 2/3 innings in one relief game without surrendering an earned run. In 1921, he posted an 11-9 W/L record 2.89 ERA in 190 innings.

Although he had limited success with the second division Phillies from 1923-27, he completed 9-of-18 starts, going 8-9, 3.53 ERA for the pennant winning Cardinals in 1928. In the 1928 World Series he pitched 5 2/3 innings in relief, allowing just a single run.

A good-hitting pitcher, Mitchell hit .252 lifetime, 41 doubles, 10 triples, 7 homers, 133 RBIs in 1287 at-bats.

Clarence Mitchell lifetime numbers: 125-139, 4.12 ERA, 390G, 278GS, 145GC, 12 Shutouts, 9 Saves, 2613 hits in 2217 innings, 116 Hr allowed, 624 Walks, 543Ks... Tigers 1911; Reds 1916-17; Dodgers 1918-22; Phillies 1923-27; Cardinals 1928-30; NY Giants 1931.

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Vic Aldridge, Chicago Cubs and Pittsburgh Pirates Pitcher - a crafty, curve ball pitcher with pin-point control, he started with Cubs in 1917, and was used mainly as a reliever in his rookie year, going 6-6, 3.12 ERA in 106 innings, in 30 games. In 1918, after pitching 3 games he was sent back to the minors and didn't return until 1922, and then was used as a starter.

Vic Aldridge rang up three nice seasons with the Cubs from 1922-1924. He was 16-15, 3.52 ERA in '22 and walked just 56 batters in 258 1/3 innings... in 1923, he completed 15-of-30 starts, posted a 16-9 record, 3.48 ERA in 217 innings. then 15-12, 3.50 ERA for the Cubs in 1924.

After that season he was traded to the Pirates and in his first season in Pittsburgh, Aldridge's hurling helped them win the pennant - 15-7, 3.63 ERA, completing 14-of-26 games. And, won Games 2 and 5 in Pittsburgh's 1925 World Series triumph over the Washington Senators in seven games.

In 1927, his 15-10 record helped the Pirates win another pennant, but this time he was the losing pitcher in Game 2 as the Pirates were swept by the Yankees in four straight.

Vic Aldridge career: 97-80 W/L, 3.76 ERA, 248G, 204GS, 102GC, 8 Shutouts, 6 Saves, 1671 hits in 1600.7 innings, 512Ws, 526Ks, 87Hr allowed... Cubs 1917-18, 1922-24; Pirates 1925-27; NY Giants 1928.

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1920 World Series 1920 World Series
Cleveland won Series 5 Games to 2 over Brooklyn

World Series 1920

Game 1 - Cleveland's Stan Coveleski scattered 5 hits as Indians win the opener 3-1.

Game 2 - Brooklyn's Burleigh Grimes tosses a 7-hit, 3-0 complete game shutout.

Game 3 - Brooklyn's Sherry Smith gives the Dodgers a 2-1 victory, by allowing only 3-hits in a 2-1 victory.

Game 4 - Indians player/manager Tris Speaker rallies his team with a pep-talk, and Stan Coveleski pitches another gem, yielding 5-hits in a complete game 5-1 win.

Game 5 - Record Setting Time - Cleveland's Elmer Smith hit the first grand slam of World Series play, a first inning blast off spit baller Burleigh Grimes... and in the 5th inning, Indians second baseman Bill Wambsganss caught a hard liner of pitcher Clarence Mitchell, and turned it into an unassisted triple play - the only one in World Series history. Indians win 8-1.

Game 6 - Indians win again as John Duster Mails pitches a 1-0 complete game shutout and Tris Speaker singles with 2-outs in the 6th and scores on a long double by George Burns in the 6th inning.

Game 7 - Cleveland Indians Win World Series as Stan Coveleski wins his third complete game of the Series - Tribe tops Dodgers 3-0. Speaker lined a triple keying an Indians game winning rally. Coveleski went 24-14, 2.49 ERA in the regular season, completed 26-of-37 games, and rang up an AL leading 133 strikeouts (Ks) in 315 innings.

Series Highlights: Coveleski yielded just 15 hits in 27 innings, struck out 8 and posted a miserly 0.67 ERA.

Tris Speaker, a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame hit .320 and scored a Series high 6 runs.

Dodgers outfielder Zack Wheat lined 9 hits in 27 at bats Including 2 doubles - .333 batting mark.

Brooklyn failed to hit a home run in the 7 game Series, While the Indians hit two, both in Game 5 - Bases loaded by Elmer Smith and a 3-run homer by pitcher Jim Bagby Sr.




1920s Baseball 1920s Baseball
When Baseball Was Baseball - 1920s Baseball History

Hitting was 'the way to go' during the 1920s. The lively ball was brought into play to create fan interest after attendance all but collapsed after the 1919 Chicago White Sox consorted with gamblers and threw the World Series.

Leading Baseball Players 1920s

* Riggs Stephenson, Cleveland Indians Second Baseman 1922-1925, Chicago Cubs Outfielder 1926-1934 - a hitting-machine, he posted the 18th highest lifetime batting average in baseball history - .338. Playing for Cleveland during his first five seasons in the majors, 1922-25, Stephenson batted .330, .339, .319, .371 and .296. Traded to the Cubs in '26, he continued his torrid batting pace. In 1927, he hit a league-leading 46 doubles... in 1929, hit .362, walked 67 times and struck out just 21 times, and his 110 RBIs vaulted the Cubs to the NL pennant... and in those World Series he hit .314 and a Series leading .444. Possessing one of baseball's best batting eyes Jackson Riggs Stephenson collected 494 career walks and fanned just 247 times in 5002 trips to the plate, spanning 1310 at bats. In his 14 years of playing, only twice did he bat under .300.

* Ivy Olson, Cleveland Indians & Brooklyn Dodgers Shortstop - one of the leading base runners and defensive shortstops of the 1910s and early 1920s, he broke in with Cleveland back in 1911, and batted .261, stole 20 bases and scored a career-high 89 runs in his rookie season. Traded to Brooklyn in late-1915, where he played nine full season - 1915-1924 His outstanding defense and clutch hitting-behind the runner played a big part in the Dodgers winning the 1920 NL pennant. In the 1920 World Series against Cleveland he batted .320, with 8 hits in 25 at bats. Ivy Olson career stats: .258 BA, 191Ds, 69Ts, 13 HRs, 730 Runs, 446 RBIs, 1575 hits in 6111 at bats, 285 Walks, 222Ks in 1572 games.

Baseball Historian

* Wally Pipp, New York Yankees First Baseman - born in Chicago, he was one of leading first basemen of this era. A veteran of 15 major league seasons, including 11 with the NY Yankees. One of the game's big power-hitters during the 'dead ball era' Pipp led the league two straight years in homeruns - with 12 in 1916 and 9 in '17, and also led by striking out 82 times in '16. Although, his power numbers did not improve with the livelier ball, his batting average increased by some 50 points and his strike outs went down by half. During this era of the Babe Ruth led Yankees, Pipp, a solid fielding first baseman, helped the Yankees win three straight pennants in 1921, 1922, 1923, and, he had a total of 7 RBIs in those 3 World Series. Walter Pipp career numbers: .281 BA, 311 Doubles, 148 Triples, 90 HRs, 596 Runs, 551 RBIs, 1941 hits in 6914 at bats, 125 Stolen Bases, 1872 Games.

* Pinky Pittenger, Boston Red Sox 1921-1923 & Chicago Cubs 1925-1929 Outfielder/3rdBaseman/Shortstop - Born in Hudson Michigan, he played seven seasons in the majors... A quality utility player, he was noted for his defensive work. A pleasant surprise after being traded to the Cubs in 1923, Clarke Pittenger hit a career-high .312 in 59 games, his first season in Chicago. In his final season with the Cubs, he hit .295 in '29... Pinky Pittenger career stats: .263 BA, 32 Doubles, 3Ts, 1HRs in 959 at bats, 373 games.




 


Masters of Their Craft - Pitching During the Early 1940s
Consider, if you will, the pitching mound masters that toiled before the onset of World War II. Note the durably of the mound workhorses and the complete games worked.

Led by a stellar pitching staff, the Cincinnati Reds won back-to-back pennants - 1939-1940 - and bested the Detroit Tigers in the 1940 World Series in seven games.

The New York Yankees took three pennants in a row 1941-1943... they took Brooklyn in 5 games in the '41 Series... lost to the Cardinals in five games in '42... and then recaptured the World Crown in '43 with a 4-games to one Series win over the Cards.

War Requirements: The World War II Act stated: - Everyone that served for our country was to be able to return to their previous job. Hence, all major league players had a job waiting.

Leading Pitchers:

By staff@baseballhistorian.com - Instant On-line Access To Baseball History

* Bucky Walters, Pitcher Cincinnati Reds, Right-handed one of baseball's dominant pitchers in this time-frame... he led the NL in wins three times, in ERA twice, and posted league-leading 31 complete games in 1939, 29 in '40 and 27 in '41... and in those three years led the league in innings - 319, 305, and 302. Helping the Reds win two straight pennants the flame-throwing Walters was 27-11, 2.29 ERA in '39 and 22-10, with a 2.48 ERA in '40... William Walters career stats: 198-160 record, 428G, 398GS, 242GC, 3,104 innings, 42 Shutouts.

* Paul Derringer, Pitcher Cincinnati Reds, Right-handed - nicknamed Duke or Dude because of his style of flashy clothes... his 18-8 rookie record for the St Louis Cardinals helped them win the pennant back in 1931... traded to Cincinnati in early 1933, he pitched over 200 innings 13 consecutive years, and twice collected over 300 innings. A four time 20-game winner, Derringer was 22-13 in '35, 21-14 in '38, and helped the Reds win the pennant with a stunning 25-7 in 1939, completing 28-of-35 starts, hurled 5 shutouts... in 1940 his 20-12 mark, with 26 complete games. 3.06 ERA helped win another pennant. Paul Derringer career: 223-212 record, 3.46 ERA, 579G, 445GS, 251GC, 3,645 innings.

* Thornton Lee, Pitcher Chicago White Sox, Left-handed - he won over ten games six times while a member of the White Sox, including a sterling 22-11 record in 1941, when he led the majors with 30 complete games, and posted the American League's best ERA - 2.37. Nicknamed 'Lefty' he began his pro career in 1928 with Salt Lake City of the Utah/Idaho League, then pitched with Globe, Tampa, New Orleans, Shreveport, Toledo and Wilkes-Barre before being brought to the majors by Cleveland at age 27 in 1933... after going 3-5 with Indians he was traded to the White Sox and started his string of winning seasons. Thornton Lee career stats: 117-124 record, 3.56 ERA, 374G, 272GS, 155GC, 2,331 innings.

* Whit Wyatt, Pitcher Brooklyn Dodgers, Right-handed - a long-term, 16-year pitching mound-stay, he debuted with Detroit back in 1929... used as a starter and reliever, Wyatt Had his best seasons from 1940 thru 1943 with the Brooklyn Dodgers. He led the league in shutouts with 5 in '40 and 7 in '41. He was 15-14 in '40, then the next year, 1941, compiled a career-high 22-10 record with a 2.34 ERA, worked 288 innings, and completed a resounding 23-of-35 starts. And, in '42 posted a 19-7 record, 2.73 ERA, completing 16-of-30 games... and was 14-5 in 1943... Whit Wyatt career stats: 106-95 record, 3.79 ERA, 360G, 210GS, 97 GC with 17 Shutouts, struck out 872 in 1,761 innings.

* Eddie Smith, Pitcher Chicago White Sox, Left-handed - won over 10 games for Sox in four-of-five years 1939-41, 1943. He was 14-9 in '40, with a solid 3.21 ERA, and completed 12-of-28 starts... Rang up a 11-11 record in '43 before serving in the US Military... rejoined the team in '46 and posted a 8-11 mark, then 1-3 record before retiring... ED Smith career stats: 73-111 record, 3.82 ERA, 282G, 197GS, 91GC, 8 Shutouts, 12 Saves in 1,595 innings. Philadelphia A's 1936-39; White Sox 1939-47; Red Sox 1947.

* Mace Brown, Pitcher Pittsburgh Pirates, Right-handed - one of baseball's first relievers, he appeared in 50 games in 1937 while collecting a league leading 5 saves... in '38 he led the league with 51 appearances. Used as a starter in his sophomore season, 1936, he went 10-11, with a solid 3.87 ERA for Pittsburgh... traded during the 1941 season, he pitched with Red Sox in '43, went 6-6 in a league-leading 49 games, and then, entered the Military. Mace Brown career stats: 76-57 record, 3.46 ERA, 387G, 55GS, 18GC, 18 Saves, 1,075 innings... Pittsburgh 1935-41; Brooklyn 1941; Red Sox 1942-43, 1946; Military 1944-45.

* Charlie Wagner, Pitcher Boston Red Sox, Right-handed - pitched five big-league seasons - 1938-1942 - before proudly servicing in the US Military... rang up a 12-8 record with a 3.07 ERA in 1941, threw 3 shutouts and completed 12-of-25 starts. In 1942, he pitched a career-high 205 innings, compiled a 14-11 mark, and completed 17-26 starts. Wagner returned to Boston in '46 after the war ended at age 34 and left the majors at season's end... Charles Wagner career stats: 32-23 record, 3.91 ERA, 100G, 67GS, 30GC, 5 Shutouts, 527.7 innings.

Claude Shoun, Pitcher St Louis Cardinals, Left-handed - a noted star reliever during his 14-year major league career... he led the National League in games and saves in 1939 with 53G and 9 saves... Shoun also led the league with 54 games in 1940, and his totals this year included 13 complete games in 19 starts and 35 relief appearances, with a 13-11 W/L and a 3.92 ERA in 197.3 innings... Claude Shoun career stats: 73-59 record, 3.91 ERA, 454G, 85GS, 34GC, 1,287 innings... Cubs 1935-37; Cardinals 1938-42; Reds 1942-47; Boston Braves 1947-49; White Sox 1949.



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